New Mass-Spectrometry-Compatible Degradable Surfactant for Tissue Proteomics


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CHANG Y., GREGORİCH Z. R. , CHEN A. J. , Hwang L., Guner H. , YU D., et al.

JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, cilt.14, ss.1587-1599, 2015 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 14 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2015
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1021/pr5012679
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.1587-1599

Özet

Tissue proteomics is increasingly recognized for its role in biomarker discovery and disease mechanism investigation. However, protein solubility remains a significant challenge in mass spectrometry (MS)-based tissue proteomics. Conventional surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the preferred surfactant for protein solubilization, are not compatible with MS. Herein, we have screened a library of surfactant-like compounds and discovered an MS-compatible degradable surfactant (MaSDeS) for tissue proteomics that solubilizes all categories of proteins with performance comparable to SDS. The use of MaSDeS in the tissue extraction significantly improves the total number of protein identifications from commonly used tissues, including tissue from the heart, liver, and lung. Notably, MaSDeS significantly enriches membrane proteins, which are often under-represented in proteomics studies. The acid degradable nature of MaSDeS makes it amenable for high-throughput MS-based proteomics. In addition, the thermostability of MaSDeS allows for its use in experiments requiring high temperature to facilitate protein extraction and solubilization. Furthermore, we have shown that MaSDeS outperforms the other MS-compatible surfactants in terms of overall protein solubility and the total number of identified proteins in tissue proteomics. Thus, the use of MaSDeS will greatly advance tissue proteomics and realize its potential in basic biomedical and clinical research. MaSDeS could be utilized in a variety of proteomics studies as well as general biochemical and biological experiments that employ surfactants for protein solubilization.